Ap euro analyze how political religious

Other religious figures condemned the work of scientists, like Giovanni Ciampoli, who in a letter to Galileo insisted that Galileo censure facts due to the disagreement of church doctrines to the findings of Galileo Doc. A prime example of this is Margaret Cavendish, being a female who strongly expressed interest in the field of science and then denied because of her gender, it is logical that she would have a bitter outlook on the narrow minded nature of society POV. The religious and uneducated people had no reason to believe or listen to ideas that blatantly contradict their faith, therefore they abstained. John Calvin, a French Protestant theologian, believed that science was only useful if it was used to glorify God Doc 2. New universities throughout Europe were also built to study the sciences further. His occupation as a doctor may have led him to this conclusion as the human body is a very complex machine, and it seemed that only God would be capable of engineering such an organism. Other religious figures condemned the work of scientists, like Giovanni Ciampoli, who in a letter to Galileo insisted that Galileo censure facts due to the disagreement of church doctrines to the findings of Galileo Doc. His personal reputation and high ranking position attributed to his decision to support scientific work POV. Popular Essays.

New universities throughout Europe were also built to study the sciences further. The rich, however, were below monarchs and religious figures according to the social hierarchy.

In his letter to Galileo, Giovanni Ciampoli said people would think he was crazy if he went public with his discoveries Doc 3. Lastly, social norms prevented people from supporting science. Religious officials high in the Church affected the way the works of scientists were viewed during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. In fact, Giovanni Ciampoli, an Italian monk, wrote to Galileo telling him that he understood his ideas but that he should not share them publicly because he is not a clergyman, therefore people would not listen to him Doc 3. For example, Louis XIV supported the building of new academies as a sign of …show more content… 1. The work of scientists in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries was affected by governments promoting, but also preventing, research of the sciences, religious bodies promoting or condemning the outcomes of experiments and theories and even merging outcomes to religious ideas, and also new relationships between scientists across Europe, but also with a neglect of women. Women, religious figures, and the poor may have wanted to support science, but doing so would cripplingly ravage the social norms that were present at this time. Leaders supported science for their own political purposes, helping in its advance. The work of scientists was affected by governments promoting, but also preventing, research of the sciences, religious bodies promoting or condemning the outcomes of experiments and theories and even merging outcomes to religious ideas, and also new relationships between scientists across Europe, but also with a neglect of women.

Aside from the barring of objectiveness, he still demonstrated that his devotion to his faith outweighed his devotion to science, which demonstrated the heart of most religious arguments in opposition to spread science and its newfound discoveries.

The work of scientists was also affected politically in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The religious and uneducated people had no reason to believe or listen to ideas that blatantly contradict their faith, therefore they abstained.

Factors that affected the work of scientists in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries

The negativity brought to works of scientists during the 16th and 17th centuries by political authority and religious officials are the very reason why the works were influential on the public during this time period. Francis Bacon, an English philosopher of science, believed that without a universal goal for the sciences across humanity, there would be little advancement Doc. In a book by Walter Charleton, an English doctor and philosopher, he states that the creation of atoms and arrangement of them could only be achieved by a higher power Doc. Other religious figure heads, such as John Calvin, a French Protestant, understood the importance of scientific works and encouraged them to be shown to the public, not condemned for the selfish reasons of Church integrity Doc 2. John Calvin, a French Protestant theologian, believed that science was only useful if it was used to glorify God Doc 2. The fuss made by the Church against scientific discoveries that disagreed with their teachings is why the works became so popular. To begin, many people did not support the new scientific discoveries because it would contradict religious doctrine. Other religious figures condemned the work of scientists, like Giovanni Ciampoli, who in a letter to Galileo insisted that Galileo censure facts due to the disagreement of church doctrines to the findings of Galileo Doc. His occupation as a doctor may have led him to this conclusion as the human body is a very complex machine, and it seemed that only God would be capable of engineering such an organism. The work of scientists was affected by governments promoting, but also preventing, research of the sciences, religious bodies promoting or condemning the outcomes of experiments and theories and even merging outcomes to religious ideas, and also new relationships between scientists across Europe, but also with a neglect of women.

Science was predominantly male dominated as was every major profession during this time period. Popular Essays.

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For many people, God was held higher than science and they took offense at the radical idea of the opposite, that science was higher than God. Social separations between male and female also affected the work of scientists.

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AP Euro: Analyze how political, religious, and social