A common misconception of americans in electoral college

A common misconception of americans in electoral college

This state-led reform movement — the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact — will not affect the race, but it might change the rules for and beyond. Today, Democrats tend to win more big states, which gives them a boost, thanks to winner-take-all. There is a complicated system, laid out in the Constitution, called the Electoral College which is not a place or a school. But such maps create the impression of a small geographic minority which can unfairly dominate vast swathes of the country. Share via email Interested in this topic? In Barack Obama received But Republicans tend to win more states overall, which gives them an offsetting boost because each state starts with a two-electoral-vote bonus. Bush in , but it could just as easily have favored Al Gore had the election season unfolded differently. Not really. The U. Were electors ever expected to make up their own minds? Second, our current presidential election process could result—and has resulted—in outcomes that are far more undemocratic than the county scenario, even under the misleading county-by-county framing. Share As the national election draws near this Tuesday, many voters have the misconception that elections are decided by the popular vote and that We the People pick our head of state. A state gets the same number of electoral votes no matter what. Hillary Clinton, meanwhile, won Massachusetts by almost a million votes but earned only 11 electoral votes.

InRonald Reagan won 51 percent of the national popular vote but 91 percent of the electoral votegiving the impression of a landslide victory and allowing him to convince Congress to approve parts of his agenda. You are substantially more likely to die in a car crash on the way to the poll.

electoral college meaning

First, and most obviously, most people don't vote for the winner. Today there are 50 States, the Population has soared to over Million people, and each Congress Member representspeople.

Kqed electoral college

With the rise of the two-party system, the modern Electoral College continued to evolve. Also, counter-examples like the founding of the Republican Party and the Bull Moose Party, and the spoiler effect of Nader in , how that the Electoral College does little to create stability. If voters are rationally ignorant, they're likely to make systematic errors when choosing representatives, leading to bad policies and bad outcomes. Was the electoral college designed to balance big and small states? Therefore, no one would know politicians outside of their own states. I, on the other hand, who did not vote, who in fact did not even leave the house on election day, am in no way responsible for what these people have done, and have every right to complain about the mess you created, that I had nothing to do with. James Madison was right, there should have been a constitutional amendment to make a uniform district voting process for president. The idea that the modern United States will not know an out-of-state candidate and will just go with whoever lives closest to them is laughable. In my course about American elections, we discuss these arguments — and how each has serious flaws. Electors were originally required to cast two votes, and one had to be from outside their home state. We pick governors in every state by direct election — one person, one vote. This system is OK for Nebraska and Maine, but it would be bad for other states. Share As the national election draws near this Tuesday, many voters have the misconception that elections are decided by the popular vote and that We the People pick our head of state.

Bad idea. Constitution does not mandate that system, however. Almost all modern-day defenses of the electoral college — avoiding recounts, boosting rural areas, etc.

How does the electoral college work

She never pursued her promise — a decision that must haunt her today. It gave whites in the southern states disproportionate power before the electors were chosen by popular vote, and it continues to give them disproportionate power now. In addition to , there have been four other times in American history — , , and — when the candidate who won the Electoral College lost the national popular vote. A majority of states even have laws requiring the partisan electors to keep their pledges when voting. Other than this odd view of democracy, which advocates spending as much campaign time in areas where few people live as in areas where most Americans live, the argument is simply false. Crucially, these regions would have included just Yet such a system in larger states would likely lead to increased political conflict and even more claims of rigging due to the extreme gerrymandering often used to create the districts. Since winner-take-all laws began in the s, electors have rarely acted independently or against the wishes of the party that chose them. Can states agree among themselves to give their electoral votes to the national popular vote winner? The idea that the modern United States will not know an out-of-state candidate and will just go with whoever lives closest to them is laughable. If we are a country governed by popular sovereignty, this is an important point.

Don't you know how many people died so you could vote?

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Ten questions, and answers, about the electoral college